Copyright & Media Update 1/10/2020

Copyright in 2020 (And Beyond) 

PLAGIARISM TODAY: 2019 ended the year, and the decade, with a headline-grabbing copyright story as a jury found Cox Communications liable to the tune of $1 billion for its failure to comply with the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) safe harbor rules. So, this raises a simple question: What’s next? With a new year and a new decade, where will these trends take us? The answer, obviously, is very complicated but there are definitely a few things to watch out for. READ MORE… 

Improving the Copyright Office Ownership Database 

COPYRIGHT ALLIANCE: The Copyright Alliance believes that a modern and efficient Copyright Office is critical to a 21st century copyright system. In addition to increased autonomy and a more advanced IT system, one step toward ensuring that the U.S. Copyright Office is adequately prepared to meet the demands of the 21st century is to modernize the copyright registration and recordation systems to afford for greater efficiency and transparency. READ MORE… 

YouTube Update Makes It Easier To Deal with Copyright Claims 

DIGITAL MUSIC NEWS: YouTube has updated its Studio platform to allow video creators the ability to more easily deal with copyright disputes. Creators now can directly respond to copyright claims in the platform’s interface. They will see the following information there. READ MORE… 

How Music Copyright Lawsuits Are Scaring Away New Hits 

ROLLING STONE: The boom in copyright lawsuits is rattling the music industry — to the point where some artists and songwriters are spending tens of thousands of dollars on insurance policies. Most of the world knows Robin Thicke, Pharrell Williams, and T.I.’s “Blurred Lines” as a half-forgotten hit song from 2013. The music industry remembers it as its worst nightmare. READ MORE… 

New Details Emerge About Rolling Stones ‘Copyright Dump’ of Unreleased 1969 Songs 

VARIETY: In the days since the brief New Year’s Eve “copyright dump” of at least 75 rare Rolling Stones songs onto YouTube just hours before their European copyright was to expire, insiders and (especially) fans have speculated at length about the origins of the tracks and the legal ramifications of the move. While reps for both the Stones and Abkco Music & Records, which administers the group’s 1960s catalog, either declined or did not respond to Variety’s requests for comment, several sources and experts have commented on both the legalities of the situation and the recording details of the songs themselves. READ MORE… 

About Christian Copyright Solutions: CCS’s quest is to help churches and Christian ministries “do music right.”  CCS is an expert on church music copyrights and our primary focus is providing licensing and clear educational resources to churches. Follow us onTwitterFacebookInstagram, and Youtube. The information contained herein is for informational purposes only and is not legal advice or a substitute for legal counsel.